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living is easy with eyes closed

18th
Apr
Fri
  • “ My first hysterectomy as a resident was on a 16-year-old who had an illegal abortion. Her pelvis was nothing but pus. That’s the sort of thing we saw all the time. I admitted about two or three women like this every night. That’s what we’re headed towards now. We’re heading back to those days. Because of the restrictions lawmakers impose, women will seek abortions illegally, and we’re going to see a rise in septic abortions. ”

    Tags:
    Notes: 3617
    Reblogged from nurselivelovelearn
  • 17th
    Apr
    Thu
  • aprilonline:

Word.  Kitteh.  Word.

    aprilonline:

    Word.  Kitteh.  Word.

    (Source: klefable)

    Tags:
    Notes: 174828
    Reblogged from wilwheaton
  • 15th
    Apr
    Tue
  • wilwheaton:

hunkgame:

aatombomb:

vanityfair:

V.F. Portrait | Neil Patrick Harris
Photograph by Annie Leibovitz. 

God damn.

UM

I have never wanted to be a snake so bad in my life.

    wilwheaton:

    hunkgame:

    aatombomb:

    vanityfair:

    V.F. Portrait | Neil Patrick Harris

    Photograph by Annie Leibovitz. 

    God damn.

    UM

    I have never wanted to be a snake so bad in my life.

    Tags:
    Notes: 6129
    Reblogged from wilwheaton
  • 15th
    Apr
    Tue
  • ilovecharts:

What Your Beer Says About You
via slightlyirresponsible

    ilovecharts:

    What Your Beer Says About You

    via 

    Tags:
    Notes: 992
    Reblogged from ilovecharts
  • 15th
    Apr
    Tue
  • Companies paid an average effective federal tax rate of 12.6 percent in 2010, the last time the Government Accountability Office measured the rate. That compares with the nominal federal tax rate of 35 percent, so all those accountants appear to have done their jobs in exploiting the loopholes in our tax code.

    The chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Representative Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, proposed a vast reform of our tax code this year, eliminating a lot of the Swiss cheese that makes it so porous and, arguably, unfair. Mr. Camp’s proposal, as you might imagine, isn’t gaining a lot of traction.

    In recognition of Uncle Sam’s payday, it’s only proper to take note of some of the most egregious corporate tax loopholes and some unexpected beneficiaries.

    ■ For the last seven years, a debate has raged over the “carried interest” benefit taken by private equity and hedge fund executives. Instead of paying ordinary rates on much of their income — typically 35 percent for the highest bracket (39.6 percent for this tax year) — these executives pay the capital gains rate of 15 percent. It’s a clear loophole that is plainly unfair. Despite repeated efforts to repeal it, the loophole has remained, in part because of well-financed industry lobbying in Washington.

    ■ If individual taxpayers are arrested, admit guilt and reach a civil settlement with the government, they cannot deduct the costs from their returns. But amazingly, a company is allowed to claim those costs as a business expense. JPMorgan Chase, for example, which has agreed to pay billions of dollars in fines for various transgressions, can deduct a large portion — and all the legal expenses — from its taxes.

    ■ A tiny but symbolic loophole still persists. Companies that own aircraft can depreciate their planes more quickly than airlines — over five years instead of seven — and claim the deduction. In total, closing the loophole is worth $3 billion to $4 billion over a decade.

    ■ A much larger loophole involves the deduction of executive stock options by the company issuing them. Inexplicably, many of Silicon Valley’s newest star companies will be able to shelter a large portion of their profits as a result. Citizens for Tax Justice estimated late last year that a dozen technology companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn and Priceline, “stand to eliminate all income taxes on the next $11.4 billion they earn — giving these companies $4 billion in tax cuts.”

    Tags:
    Notes: 106
    Reblogged from inothernews
  • 15th
    Apr
    Tue

    (Source: jeffbritta)

    Tags:
    Notes: 2941
    Reblogged from meganshimko
    15th
    Apr
    Tue

    (Source: jeffbritta)

    Tags:
    Notes: 2941
    Reblogged from fuckyeahparksandrec
    14th
    Apr
    Mon
    11th
    Apr
    Fri

    fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

    samflow:

    The SCAR Project: Breast Cancer Is Not A Pink Ribbon

    The SCAR Project is a series of large-scale portraits of young breast cancer survivors shot by fashion photographer David Jay. Primarily an awareness raising campaign, The SCAR Project puts a raw, unflinching face on early onset breast cancer while paying tribute to the courage and spirit of so many brave young women.

    Dedicated to the more than 10,000 women under the age of 40 who will be diagnosed this year alone, The SCAR Project is an exercise in awareness, hope, reflection and healing.

    Read more here

    Now HERE’S a good goddamn glimpse at breast cancer.  Fuck your “save second base” bullshit.  -C

    Tags:
    Notes: 166171
    Reblogged from willowroar
    9th
    Apr
    Wed
  • Tags:
    Notes: 450
    Reblogged from popcorn-l0ve
  • 9th
    Apr
    Wed
  • Tags:
    Notes: 94181
    Reblogged from moretoonsgifs
  • 9th
    Apr
    Wed
  • authorsarahdessen:

Rock on. 

    authorsarahdessen:

    Rock on. 

    (Source: ampersandles)

    Tags:
    Notes: 3527
    Reblogged from authorsarahdessen
  • 9th
    Apr
    Wed

    robdelaney:

    dstroym:

    Every few hours yesterday I made up one of these “Facts” images and posted it to FB. Not only did no one call me out but I received numerous compliments and one guy even took credit for an image.

    lol the one with Chicago and the stuff about Kansas. Also “5 degrees rounder”- wat? And all the typos… These are hilarious.

    So fucking funny.

    Tags:
    Notes: 1754
    Reblogged from robdelaney
    8th
    Apr
    Tue
  • amandapalmer:

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?
Allow me to answer that for you:
A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
"a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
"a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
"rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)

A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
"Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
"An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
"Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
"Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
"Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
"Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
"Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)
Does that about answer it?

i saw these statistics in one of the TED talks a few weeks ago.
depressing as fuck.
go USA.

    amandapalmer:

    fact-tory:

    lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

    smellyanne:

    lookatthisfuckinradfem:

    Well, you know…shit.

    why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

    you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

    Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?

    Allow me to answer that for you:

    • A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
      • "a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
      • "a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
      • "rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)
    • A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
    • Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
    • "Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
    • "An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
    • "Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
    • "Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
    • "Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
    • "Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
    • "Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)

    Does that about answer it?

    i saw these statistics in one of the TED talks a few weeks ago.

    depressing as fuck.

    go USA.

    Tags:
    Notes: 149532
    Reblogged from lauriehalseanderson
  • 8th
    Apr
    Tue

    jackiecello23:

    But when I was doing the scene, [director] Alex Graves said “When you say that last line, ‘I can be your family,’ say it like ‘I love you.’” And that’s the take that they used. (x)

    image

    (Source: annies-crestas)

    Tags:
    Notes: 35195
    Reblogged from lauriehalseanderson
    »

    Accent Red by Neil Talwar